What are the Different Types of Chainsaws?

A chainsaw is a popular tool for tree-cutting. It is used to cut down trees, clear forests, and take care of unwanted shrubbery.

It is powered by an engine that has its piston connected to the sprocket, with a variety of cutting teeth. This mechanism is mechanically geared to the rotating chain with taut metal cables. When the throttle is locked in the on position, the engine generates power that moves both the blade and sprocket around continuously at speed with only moments of interruption when changing direction.

Every chainsaw is different, each with its own features and specs, so it can seem difficult to choose the right one. There are five most common types of chainsaws. In this guide, we explained each type with its pros and cons, which will help you buy the right one according to your needs.

5 Different Types of Chainsaws

Gas Powered Chainsaw

Gas Powered Chainsaw

The gas chainsaw is a definitive version that lasts longer than any other type. They are known for their portability, power, and loudness.

One of the primary reasons individuals pick gas chainsaws is that their cutting execution and speed can’t be matched by electric or battery models.

Pros

  • Powerful to cut trees
  • Extremely portable
  • Long life span if maintained well
  • Simple repairs & most rugged
  • Long cutting times

Cons

  • Bulky
  • Requires fuel mixed with oil
  • Needs the most maintenance
  • Produces fuel emissions
  • Can be a hassle to start
  • Loud

Electric Chainsaw

Electric Chainsaw

These kinds of chainsaws do not have motors but instead, work with electrical engines. You should plug an electric chainsaw into an electrical plug to start operating them. This restricts their movability and use (when power runs out).

However, these chainsaws are very light and provide a wide range of bar lengths. They are likewise affordable than gas chainsaws.

Pros

  • Convenient to operate
  • Push-button start
  • Lightweight & Quiet
  • Not much maintenance
  • Easy for beginners to use
  • No fuel emissions
  • Affordable

Cons

  • Must be plugged into an electrical outlet
  • Limited to cord length
  • Can not be used during the power outage
  • Repairs need professional servicing

Battery Operated Chainsaw

Battery Operated Chainsaw

The popularity of battery chainsaws has grown rapidly and many designs now compete well with gas chainsaws. With the battery-powered design, you get all the advantages of a gas chainsaw but without a load of utilizing fuel.

On the downside, battery chainsaws are the most expensive type. The lithium-particle batteries they utilize don’t come modest. However, the long-term cost of ownership is affordable because you do not need to buy fuel to run it.

Pros

  • Push-button start
  • Low maintenance
  • No gas fumes
  • Quiet
  • Fully portable

Cons

  • Cutting times vary by product
  • Recharging times also vary by model
  • Repairs need professional servicing
  • Can not utilize when batteries are recharging
  • Expensive
  • Limited battery life

Pole Saws

Pole Saws

The pole saw is primarily a chain on the pole. They permit you to climb trees to prune limbs and pruning branches.
The pole saw is the best secondary chainsaw, as it may not be your initial tool.

Pros

  • Can reach high places
  • Simple to manage
  • Lightweight & inexpensive
  • Multiple choices for shape and power
  • Perfect for reaching high limbs

Cons

  • Only helpful in particular situations
  • Not as strong as handheld saws

Manual Chainsaw

Manual Chainsaw

The manual chainsaw is also named a pocket chainsaw, which is not a nickname – you can keep it in your pocket. The pocket chainsaw has a chain with teeth at both ends with blades attached to the handles.

To utilize one, wrap it around what you are trying to cut, then rapidly pull it back. It is just as tiring as it sounds and lasts constantly, but it is also emission-free, almost quiet, and amazingly portable.

Pros

  • Portable & Quiet
  • Can utilize in tough to reach areas
  • Lightweight & Cheap
  • Requires no power
  • Convenient to carry around

Cons

  • Slow cutting
  • Needs muscle power by the user
  • Perfect for light-duty tasks
  • Takes a long time
  • Difficult to use